Veronica Mars is still smarter than me…

mr kiss and tell

When Veronica Mars came onto the screen originally in 2004 I was 16 years old, and turned 17 during the duration of the first season. We were then, roughly the same age which means when the show was cancelled, during both hers and my first year of college I was crushed.

Of course we had nothing in common. I’m a brunette. She’s a blonde. She lived in the seedy little town of Neptune where the rich ruled and the poor…well they didn’t didn’t do so well.

But she, unlike a lot of female characters at the time, was someone who I wanted to be like. Sure she could be rude, and tended to blaze forward without thinking of the consequences but she always stood for what she thought was right, whether it had to do with her friends or a complete stranger.

When the movie came about, a near seven years after the show’s cancellation I was thrilled. When the first book came out I bought it and read it in a few mere hours.

Veronica is 29 now. Suddenly she’s two years older than me, but like myself and so many other’s my age she’s still a little bit lost.

Her relationships have either flourished or fallen, and Neptune if possible is seedier than ever, the underbelly making its way to the top and  aided by the Sheriff (and isn’t that always the way).

But what remains consistent, from TV show, to movie to books is Veronica’s voice, and it rings pretty clear. The characterization is cohesive with who she was on the show, to who she became in the movie. Mac’s expanded role is something to smile at, though certain other characters minimized showing in the book did cause me some concern.

But either way, this book is exactly what I want Veronica Mars to be, feisty, determined, dangerous reckless, and as always…smarter than me. And everyone else in the room.

It is not a perfect book, as there are always flaws, just as there are in our heroes. But there is justice…and there is uncertainty.

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Review: The Storied Life of A.J Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin

the storied life

Pardon my French.

But this book, this fucking book. It’s beautiful. Just one word. Beauty.

The writing wove itself around me, bringing back memories of childhood spent in the stacks of my old library, of an old bookstore run by an older woman who genuinely cared about what people were reading and the impression it left behind.

I remember the way a mom and pop bookstore smelt, long gone from the area I currently live in and the one I lived in for 26 years, up until a few months ago. This book brought back memories of the heavy scent of paper, of dust, and the feeling of pages under my fingertips, even as I enjoyed the ebook I wished for a physical copy.

It was gorgeously written, and a tribute to readers, as well as writers and the emotions evoke within us. This book reminds me of time spent with friends, talking over books, gushing over what we were reading.

Those moments have come few and far between but I’m thinking maybe, next week, I might go to my local book club.

After all, some of the best ways to get to know people involve books, don’t they?

Review: Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

frankenstein

When I was eighteen or nineteen do you know what I was doing?

Not crafting a masterpiece of literature while spending time with my soulmate. I believe I was actually freaking out over college applications coming in.

Mary Shelley was fast working on something that would leave her a master of a genre, perhaps one of the foremost writers of the gothic horror movement.

She was writing about humanity in a way that was horrific, in a way that would make every reader consider how they react to people, what they would do if they could harness the power of God and “how on earth a woman could come up with such a plot?”

In the company of her husband, Percy, and none other than Lord Byron himself Shelley would later say that the plot came to her when she lay her head down to sleep. However I doubt she would realize until much later the impact that this novel would have in later years. How it would continuously be in print, and would spurn on continuous re-writes, movie adaptaions, TV adaptations, halloween costumes, comics, jokes, drawings…

But there’s a reason it lasts and it lies in the beauty of the writing. The well formed, elegant prose, guaranteed to enrapture and capture the reader, the slow unraveling of the story and the very question of what it means to be human. Of what it means to have power.

It is also to see, given context how this book may have ended up banned, though I will never agree with banning any book. But the author in question was not only female, but wrote about someone taking in the power of God, of creating life without married reproduction.

I recommend this book to anyone who loves a classic, or anyone who loves a scientific spurned horror tale. Or just anyone.

Three Reviews for the Price of One

Jurassic Park

Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton

I don’t know what made me wait so long to read any of Michael Crichton’s books, after all he was definitely a master of plot, characters and he usually did a pretty good job on his science as well.

Jurassic Park, the book which the movie phenomenon ended up based off is a masterful work of writing. Even though I knew the premise, and the end, it was the explanation behind how this could have happened that had me rapidly flipping the pages. I searched for the differences, marvelled at the way in which it was written and loved every second of it until the end.

Crichton’s books are now on my to be read list, and i’m very excited to read The Lost World, and even his other novels as well.

river marked

River Marked by Patricia Briggs

This is one of those series’ of books that I was initially very “meh” about while reading it, but I have come to love through time. They are typically quick reads, but I always felt something was missing throughout the books until this one.

The main character, Mercy Thompson is as sassy as ever, and I’m glad to see that didn’t change with a change in relationship status. She will always fight for what she believes in and I was happy to see the current mythologies of this series, fae, vampire,lycanthrope and otherwise melding, and clashing against the mythologies existing in the Native American tribes.

This books is a page turner, and I really did enjoy every minute of the wild ride.

frost burned

Frost Burned by Patricia Briggs

This book was a little bit more of a slow burn, if you don’t mind the cliche, for me. I don’t know if I was burnt out from having read the series back to back or what, but it was just plain hard for me to get into at first.

However, once I got into it, that was it. The pacing sped up, new characters were introduced, and certainly left their mark, and a shiver of fear behind. The vampires role was explained just a little bit further, but not too much, meaning their presence will continue to be enticing and somewhat frustrating.

Mercy’s relationship with Jesse made me smile in this, as it seems to have grown just the slightest bit and as per usual certain scenes had me laughing aloud while others, and Mercy’s stubbornness had be shaking my head.